Saul Transport


From what I may remember it started with Harry Purcell who had the garage at the Pike on the Fretherne Road at Saul. Harry had a few lorries which he did general haulage and the transport of hay for local farmers. Be aware at the time of the 1950’s Road Haulage vehicles were licenced A, B, C and from what I remember “A “licences were extremely valuable as you could carry goods anywhere a “B” licences restricted the vehicle to a given distance usually around thirty miles and “C” licences were to only carry your own goods. Harry had “B” licences and often these were as valuable as the vehicle.


Ivor Wren worked for Harry and it was said was owed a mass of wages but be that as it may Ivor ended up with one of the lorries and the title to Saul Transport although there was H.Purcell in brackets in the name. Ivor became a small goods carrier and operated really the first “Next Day” delivery service. Working through agents he would get a load’s worth of “Smalls” three times a week He invariably worked Saturdays whence he would go to Avonmouth and Bristol for 7am start either at the Docks or in one of the Warehouses. This would provide his deliveries for Monday. Tuesday back to Bristol or Avonmouth, Wednesday deliver, Thursday collect, Friday deliver and a similar pattern every week.


















My first memory was going with Ivor in a WD petrol Bedford similar to the one shown above by Charles01 in Wikipedia in British Railways livery . Ivor’s was painted in mid brown all over!

Later he purchased a secondhand S type bedford from Roger Hough of Hough and Whitmore who were Gloucester’s Bedford/Vauxhall Dealer. I think it belong to Reynolds Flour Mill before it came to Saul Transport. A few Years later and Ivor purchased the first of the Bedford TK lorries which at the time was a revolution in comfort and design. Finally he purchased a second Bedford TK and ran both lorries for a short while. Occasionally he would have more work than he could cope with and would get two other part time hauliers to help out. The first of these was Joe Yeates from Nupend and the other Mr Underwood from Eastington but there work would only be for possibly one or two days.


Saturday mornings and an early start with Ivor tap, tapping gently on the bedroom window then away we would go, and if to Avonmouth for the long protracted wait at the Dock Office where you submitted your papers and waited and waited to be allocated a shed where the goods were stored and loaded. If there were several pick ups then that was the morning gone and by mid-day the docks would finish for Saturday. I remember most the huge posters warning you of poisonous snakes and ferocious spiders all which came with the bananas.  In Bristol, Warriners was a favoutite pick up then the Bush warehouse and a small cavern just off the centre in Anchor Road, we visited all the sheds in the docks as they were all active at that time. A delivery of “finings’ from Collets in the Bristol Road Gloucester to the Channel island boats,  large band saws from the timber merchants in Gloucester to a Saw Doctor just off Old Market. Jeyes fluid and associated products from Finzell Bury’s (Berry’s?) in Stokes Croft before finally making for the Stotts the Butchers up the Gloucester Road for meat for Sunday.

Saul Transport’s S type was extremely similar but with both headlamps and painted cream and brown.

This is as close as you could get to a picture of Ivor’s new TK Bedford

suppied by Roger Hough of Hough and Whitmore who were Gloucester’s Vauxhall-Bedford Dealers.  Even the paint layout and colour is close.


Image created by Simon GP Geoghegan.

Used with kind permission.

Saul Transport


From what I may remember it started with Harry Purcell who had the garage at the Pike on the Fretherne Road at Saul. Harry had a few lorries which he did general haulage and the transport of hay for local farmers. Be aware at the time of the 1950’s Road Haulage vehicles were licenced A, B, C and from what I remember “A “licences were extremely valuable as you could carry goods anywhere a “B” licences restricted the vehicle to a given distance usually around thirty miles and “C” licences were to only carry your own goods. Harry had “B” licences and often these were as valuable as the vehicle.


Ivor Wren worked for Harry and it was said was owed a mass of wages but be that as it may Ivor ended up with one of the lorries and the title to Saul Transport although there was H.Purcell in brackets in the name. Ivor became a small goods carrier and operated really the first “Next Day” delivery service. Working through agents he would get a load’s worth of “Smalls” three times a week He invariably worked Saturdays whence he would go to Avonmouth and Bristol for 7am start either at the Docks or in one of the Warehouses. This would provide his deliveries for Monday. Tuesday back to Bristol or Avonmouth, Wednesday deliver, Thursday collect, Friday deliver and a similar pattern every week.


















My first memory was going with Ivor in a WD petrol Bedford similar to the one shown above by Charles01 in Wikipedia in British Railways livery . Ivor’s was painted in mid brown all over!

Later he purchased a secondhand S type bedford from Roger Hough of Hough and Whitmore who were Gloucester’s Bedford/Vauxhall Dealer. I think it belong to Reynolds Flour Mill before it came to Saul Transport. A few Years later and Ivor purchased the first of the Bedford TK lorries which at the time was a revolution in comfort and design. Finally he purchased a second Bedford TK and ran both lorries for a short while. Occasionally he would have more work than he could cope with and would get two other part time hauliers to help out. The first of these was Joe Yeates from Nupend and the other Mr Underwood from Eastington but there work would only be for possibly one or two days.


Saturday mornings and an early start with Ivor tap, tapping gently on the bedroom window then away we would go, and if to Avonmouth for the long protracted wait at the Dock Office where you submitted your papers and waited and waited to be allocated a shed where the goods were stored and loaded. If there were several pick ups then that was the morning gone and by mid-day the docks would finish for Saturday. I remember most the huge posters warning you of poisonous snakes and ferocious spiders all which came with the bananas.  In Bristol, Warriners was a favoutite pick up then the Bush warehouse and a small cavern just off the centre in Anchor Road, we visited all the sheds in the docks as they were all active at that time. A delivery of “finings’ from Collets in the Bristol Road Gloucester to the Channel island boats,  large band saws from the timber merchants in Gloucester to a Saw Doctor just off Old Market. Jeyes fluid and associated products from Finzell Bury’s (Berry’s?) in Stokes Croft before finally making for the Stotts the Butchers up the Gloucester Road for meat for Sunday.

Saul Transport’s S type was extremely similar but with both headlamps and painted cream and brown.

This is as close as you could get to a picture of Ivor’s new TK Bedford

suppied by Roger Hough of Hough and Whitmore who were Gloucester’s Vauxhall-Bedford Dealers.  Even the paint layout and colour is close.


Image created by Simon GP Geoghegan.

Used with kind permission.